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An unexpected benefit to being an adventurer

The edges Sandy were upon us last night and Dachary commented about how I wasn’t taking the storm too seriously. It’s true. I’ve been pretty chill about it. But here’s why: we’re adventurers, and are pretty much good to go on a worldwide adventure at a moments notice, and it turns out that our “life on the road” kit makes a pretty damn good disaster kit too.

If the power goes out we’ve got a JetBoil propane stove with a backup canister. If we run out of propane we’ve got the multifuel stove and spare gasoline. If we run out of gasoline we’ve got oil. If we run out of oil we’ve got some alcohol. We’ve got a pretty good first-aid kit (including sterile needles and syringes and splints). We’ve got a little camp food and we’ve got a bad-ass water purifier that can filter out things as small as viruses (Brita’s can’t dream of this) so I wouldn’t be too bothered if I had to go suck up water from puddles on the street.

We bought six gallons of water, and filled up another six liters worth of camelbacks (we have at least another 25 liters worth of bladders and Camelbaks we could fill up if we wanted to). We bought some non-perisable things at the store, but not too much as it’d be pretty surprising if Boston fell into Katrina level badness from this.

If it gets too cold we can set up a tent in the house to conserve our radient heat. We’ve got plenty of sleeping bags and air mattresses for us and the dogs. Living in New England, and occasionally riding motorcycles at speed over mountain ranges, we’re also set on the cold weather clothing front.

And, when it goes dark we’ve got headlamps, tent lamps, and spare batteries.

So yeah. I’m not too worried.