Geeky


Libraries, Fameworks, and DSLs

One of my coworkers was trying to understand the differences between libraries, frameworks, and DSLs and asked me …how do I know what i’m using when all these things are interacting and being used within each other, etc To some degree, you don’t, and it doesn’t matter, but that’s not a very helpful answer. So let me step back and talk about what each of these are.┬áLibraries Libraries are the simplest.

Converting HTML to PDF on the command line

I recently needed to convert some HTML to PDF on the command line and went hunting down the options. There numerous posts saying “X is great” “Y works great for me” but no-one gives examples that show you anything. I’ve tried WeasyPrint and wkhtmltopdf and Google Chrome (yes via the command line). The test was simple. Take a simple color chart, made from pre-formatted text and render it as a pdf.

Zed Shaw's Utu: Saving the internet with hate

A high level summary (and paraphrasing) of Zed Shaw’s talk at DEFCON 15 (in 2007) because I couldn’t find a good text version. Utu is the Maori word for a system of revenge used by Maori society to provide social controls and retribution. Utu is also a protocol that uses cryptographic models of social interaction to allow peers to vote on their dislike of other peer’s behavior. The goal of Utu is to experiment with the effects of bringing identity, reputation, and retribution to human communications on the Internet.

The Guy Who Loved His Work

(or Why A Healthy Work-Life Balance Is Important) During the dot com boom I worked at a company with a developer who loved his work. The problems were challenging, and we really valued the things he produced. Everyone who worked late late got dinner, and sometimes he’d work so late that he ended up sleeping by his desk. Bob (not his real name) wasn’t pushed to do this. He just really liked his job.

How to use the same Scuttlebutt identity on multiple computers.

v2.1 (Note: Manyverse / mobile users please see the warning at the end.) Offically Scuttlebutt doesn’t support posting from the same identity on multiple computers (as of Dec 2017). Unofficially, it’s easy but requires a little bit of care. In practice this means never run the Scuttlebutt client on two computers at the same time. The gotcha is that if you post from both computers before the changes of one have had a chance to replicate to the second via scuttlebutt one or both of your feeds will get screwed up and other people won’t see some of your own posts ever again.

Keeping a great Changelog

Changelogs are an invaluable, and often neglected part of any software project. So, how do you do that? A good changelog helps you users to understand: Why they should care about your latest version If any of your changes affect the problems or frustrations they’ve been having. If there are any changes that might affect how they use your app / library. Why your efforts are worth their continued support.

Why you can't auto-generate your Changelog

Let’s start by taking it as a given that a Changelog file is something very valuable that every product should come with. Even if your “product” is a library for other developers. With that in mind, the question rises of “How can I make it really easy to generate one”. Many developers have had exactly that thought. There are many free and some paid solutions that will “Autogenerate your changelog from your git commits/tickets”.

Software worth recommending

There are lots of great tools out there. Far too many to try. Here are the ones that I’ve tried, and found worth recommending. Mostly they’re OS X Developer Things Quiver is a “Programmer’s Notebook”. I’ve recently switched to it from CodeBox which seems to have been abandoned by its developer. I’ve got some minor quibbles with Quiver, but overall it’s pretty nice and I’ll be bringing all my code snippets and reference material over to it.

Static vs. Dynamic Blogging

You’ve got a lot of software options when setting up a blog. Over the years. I’ve used or tried most of the options including, but not limited to: WordPress, Jekyll, Octopress, and at least 3 custom built systems. What follows is my thinking on the pros and cons of each option, and why I’m switching back to a static blog system (Hugo this time). Dynamic Blogs (WordPress, etc.) Dynamic blogs, like WP, have a lot going for them:

Vampire Bug [Definition]

Vampire Bug: n. something that worked when you went to bed at 2AM, but when exposed to the light of the next day dies horribly. Typically the exposure proves that it couldn’t possibly have been working at 2AM either.

How to enable GitHub 2 factor Authentication on new device / app

( as of Sept 30th 2014 ) These are the instructions for how to do it if you’ve already got it configured and need to add a new app / device. If you don’t have it set up already, GitHub’s docs are… probably passable. Go to Settings Click on Security In the “Two-factor authentication” section click “Edit” Yes, even though you don’t want to edit it. Under “Delivery options” click “Reconfigure two-factor authentication Yes, even though you don’t want to reconfigure it.

What would you want to do?

This afternoon my intern asked me this simple question. She’s a new developer, and a friend of hers is working in a fresh codebase, with best practices. Everything is nice, and he can keep the entirety of it in his head. She’s working with my team, Support Engineering. We’re the front-line bug squashers at our company. We’ve got a legacy codebase with no tests and brain melting insanity around every bend.

Bonsai Coding

Writing code is a lot like maintaining a Bonsai Tree. If you stop pruning it it’ll stop being a Bonsai and turn into a bush. Little tweaks, frequently aesthetic ones, will help to keep it beautiful and under control. It will still grow in unexpected directions, as other developers make changes, but careful pruning will keep it balanced, and healthy. What is “careful pruning” then? Each file is a branch on our tree.

Setting the Atomic Clock

This morning’s shower brought me an interesting series of thoughts that I thought you might appreciate, and it all started with the simple question of “How do you set The Atomic Clock?” My first thought was that at some point you have to find some other clock and precisely sync up with it. Then again, they may have said “fuck it” and just had Bob press a button when some other clock flipped over, but then I wondered “How do we know what time it is in the first place?

Some useful Vim plugins

There are two things that make using vim awesome… no there are about 200,000 but most of them involve adding a few lines to your .vimrc to enable them, or installing a plugin. My .vimrc is just over 300 lines after all these years of use and customization. But, rather than go into all that, I figured some of the vim geeks out there might appreciate a pointer to some of the plugins I use.

Rebasing A Pull Request on GitHub

It’s generally good practice to rebase commits on a topic branch into a single commit before merging. It results in a much cleaner commit history, and makes rollbacks easier. The Question However, the question was raised: what happens if you… fix a bug (commit 1) create a Pull Request get feedback via the Pull Request fix the bug fix (commit 2) rebase those two commits together (new tree-ish) push that back to GitHub (requires push -f ) The answer is based on understanding that a GitHub pull request has two forms of commenting: * comments on the pull request itself * comments on the commits that the pull request encapsulates.

Git: pushing and pulling from multiple repos

Lets assume you’ve already cloned a remote repo and have been working with it. Now, someone has set up a second repo out there for the same codebase, and you’d like to interact with both. *Please note: The following is based on the assumption that you have write privileges to the second repo, but don’t worry, you do essentially the same thing if you don’t and I’ll cover the differences at the end.

Blog post dates: Precision, or freshness. What's important?

Not too long ago I sent out a question. I asked people when, and why, dates were important to them on blog posts. The responses were revealing, both for what they did, and did not contain. There are some situations where having a date on your blog posts is obviously needed. If you write about anything techy you absolutely need them. I come across tons of sites with perfectly good code examples, that have been obsolete for years.

An offer for Web Geeks

I’d like to make a simple offer to the web geeks out there: One hour of one person’s skills, to make the web a little bit more awesome, and raise $75 for your favorite environmental or medical charity. Information Architects (the people behind iAWriter) have come up with a really spectacular JavaScript / CSS widget. When you load one of their long articles (like this one) you’ll see a widget in the top right corner that says “Older | Newer” and links you to the previous or next article.

Using Git Bisect to Crush Your Enemies

Using Git Bisect …to crush your enemies and/or bugs Or, how to save countless hours and find out where things broke Git bisect is the most awesome, and most poorly publicized feature of git. It allows git to walk through your branch and quickly find out which commit broke things. The usage is simple. You point git to a bad commit ( usually the most recent one ) and you point it to a good commit (the most recent one you know of when things were working).

My New Favorite Interview Question

I interview a fair number of geeks every year and usually spend my alotted time going over one programming challenge. Lately I’ve been looking for a new one that was simple, but still big enough to give me a glimpse into their thinking. I think I’ve found it. Why I Like This I really like this question because: A good solution involves recursion but you could approach it in multiple ways.

Localization for Struts Freemarker users

Because it took me freaking forever to find instructions on how to do this… You do NOT need a message-resource tag in your struts configuration files. Those are outdated instructions for old versions of Struts.You do not need to edit ANY xml at all. Your Action needs to implement Freemarker’s TemplateMethodModel interface You need a package.properties file (the default locale) and a then another one for each other locale / language you want to support (ex.

Developershare [definition]

Developershare: adj. The percentage or proportion of the total available pool of developers that is coding for a particular product or platform. Example: Regardless of how good the Palm Pre is, Palm will be hard-pressed to steal any of iPhone’s developershare.

Why you should use a distributed version control system

If you’ve ever: made a commit and then realized you forgot “one little change”. made a commit and regretted it. wished you could combine some the past couple days worth of commits into one nice combined commit in the main branch. wished you could commit just part of a file. needed to drop work on one task and switch tracks to another one without having to make commits with unfinished changes, or commits with changes for one issue and a little of another.

typelation [Definition]

typelation: n. The act of converting speech, or thoughts, into text for a text-based conversation (e-mail, instant messages, etc.). Example: The joke lost something in the typelation.


How to create a Test Suite in Perl's Test::Unit v0.25

If your Test Case is a package whose goal is to test all aspects of a particular class then a Test Suite is something which kicks off a collection of related Test Cases. As with most things in Perl’s Test::Unit it’s really easy to do and also terribly documented. So, without further ado… You need something to kick off all your tests: use Test::Unit::HarnessUnit; use My::Test::Suite::Package; my $testrunner = Test::Unit::HarnessUnit->new(); $testrunner->start("My::Test::Suite::Package"); Next you need the test suite it’s going to kick off:

XML-RPC vs SOAP

Update: This article was written years ago, however, the information still holds true. What I would note is that these days both XML-RPC and SOAP have excellent libraries which makes working with both fairly simple. This article is about the capabilities of the two technologies, however, in my experience the question is no longer one of capabilities. It’s a question of which one you need to talk to, or which one your framework has baked in.